Johanna Kinkel (1810-1858) [PLOT 100]

German pianist, composer, poet, and writer.
Kinkel was an author of considerable merit. She wrote on musical subjects, including regular review articles of music events for the Bonner Zeitung, a newspaper she and her husband edited. An autobiographical novel of hers, Hans Ibeles in London, was published posthumously in 1860. She had a substantial output of musical compositions and wrote music for her children. She died on 15 November 1858 in London and is buried with her daughters Marie Kinkel (January–February 1861) and Johanna Kinkel (1845-1863).

Dr Alice Vickery Drysdale (1844-1929) [PLOT 108]

Doctor and promotor of birth control. President of Malthusian League.
She was an English physician, campaigner for women’s rights, and the first British woman to qualify as a chemist and pharmacist. She and her life partner, Charles Robert Drysdale, actively supported a number of causes, including free love, birth control, and destigmatisation of illegitimacy.

Charles Robert Drysdale (1829-1907) Alice Drysdale (1844-1929) [PLOT 108]

Charles Robert Drysdale (1829-1907) Alice Drysdale (1844-1929) [PLOT 108]

Doctor and engineer. Founder of the Malthusian League.
Charles was an English engineer, physician and public health scientist, and the first President of the Malthusian League. He published books on the topics of the evils of prostitution and the dangers of tobacco smoking.

Doctor and promotor of birth control. President of Malthusian League.
Alice was an English physician, campaigner for women’s rights, and the first British woman to qualify as a chemist and pharmacist. She and her life partner, Charles Robert Drysdale, actively supported a number of causes, including free love, birth control, and destigmatisation of illegitimacy.

Bennet Graham Burleigh (1840-1914) [PLOT105]

Journalist.

Born in Glasgow, he began work as a shipping clerk at the age of 20. Shortly afterwards, he was forced to marry one of the family’s servants after getting her pregnant. Burley left for North America with another clerk to take part in the American Civil War. He joined the Confederates, disrupting Union ship traffic. Burley was captured in May 1864 but escaped a month later. He took part in a raid on Lake Erie in September 1864. Burley had convinced a Canadian cousin in Guelph, to manufacture munitions for use in that raid. He returned to Guelph but was later captured and extradited to the United States. The jury deadlocked at his first trial and he was returned to jail to await a second trial. Burley was able to escape to Canada and returned to Scotland. At this point, he changed his name to Bennet Burleigh.

In 1881, he was hired by the London Telegraph to cover the war in Sudan. He was a correspondent for the Central News Agency during the bombardment of Alexandria in 1882. Burleigh was the first to report the failure of the Gordon relief expedition, which led to the slaughter of the Khartoum garrison. He also covered the Boer War and the Russo-Japanese War. He authored several books on his experiences reporting on conflicts. Burleigh ran unsuccessfully several times for Glasgow seats in the British parliament. He died in Bexhill on June 17, 1914. Burleigh is thought by some to be a model for the correspondent Gilbert Torpenhow in Rudyard Kipling’s The Light that Failed.

SIR JAMES BRUNLEES (1816-1892) [PLOT 105]

Civil Engineer.
James was born in Kelso on 5th January 1816. He was sent to school at the age of six were he excelled in arithmetic and elementary mensuration. His father removed him from school when he was twelve and set him to work with him on the estate of Broomlands Farm, with the idea of James becoming a landscape gardener.

A chance meeting with Mr Alexander Adie who was surveying the grounds and being allowed to assist him made James realise he wished to be an engineer. This he did and worked on many landmark constructions, a scheme for the Channel Tunnel was one. In 1886 he received a knighthood. He died at his home in Wimbledon on 2nd June 1892 and is buried with his family.